Phyllis Shelton

Phyllis Shelton is the President of LTC Consultants, a Nashville-based company that she founded in 1991 specializing in long-term care insurance sales training, consumer education and marketing materials. She is widely considered to be the leading long-term care insurance sales trainer in the country. Now her heart goes out to anyone who doesn't have a local insurance professional to help them consider long-term care insurance, and she is willing to be a resource for those people, or their financial advisors.

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Author's posts

Is CPI Inflation Adequate?

You will definitely want to pick up Prudential’s 2010 Long-Term Care Cost Study, which measures trends in costs associated with the major forms of long-term care services. (See the link to this survey under “What Does Long-Term Care Cost?” on this site.) I’ve seen the cost of care increase an average of 5-6% compounded annually …

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State Budget Shortfalls and State-Specific Budget Cuts

Public-Private Long-Term Care Insurance Plans will have a tremendously positive impact on state budgets if we educate employers to offer it now to all employees to decrease cuts in other services like you see here.

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States Continue to Feel Recession’s Impact

By Elizabeth McNichol, Phil Oliff, and Nicholas Johnson

The worst recession since the 1930s has caused the steepest decline in state tax receipts on record. State tax collections, adjusted for inflation, are now 12 percent below pre-recession levels, while the need for state-funded services has not declined. As a result, even after making very deep spending cuts over the last two years, states continue to face large budget gaps.

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An Update on State Budget Cuts

By Nicholas Johnson, Phil Oliff, and Erica Williams

With tax revenue still declining as a result of the recession and budget reserves largely drained, the vast majority of states have made spending cuts that hurt families and reduce necessary services. These cuts, in turn, have deepened states’ economic problems because families and businesses have less to spend.

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