Tag Archive: CLASS Act

Jan 07

What Happened to the New Government Program That Was Supposed to Pay for Long-Term Care?

The Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) Act was a provision in the 2010 health care reform act (Public Law 111-148) that was supposed to provide an average benefit of $50 a day depending on the level of impairment with a lifetime (unlimited) benefit period. This benefit would grow each year based on Urban …

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Sep 22

The CLASS Act (YES, You Still Need Long‐Term Care Insurance!!)

The Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) Act is a provision in Section 8002 of the new health care reform bill (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Public Law 111‐148) enacted March 23, 2010. The CLASS Act is supposed to provide a small cash benefit of an average of $50 a day with a lifetime benefit period depending on the level of impairment. For example, needing help with four Activities of Daily Living vs. two would result in an increased benefit. This benefit is guaranteed issue and is designed to help people with limitations stay in the community instead of going to a nursing home. The program is supposed to be funded solely by premiums paid by employees who do not opt out via payroll deductions by the employers who choose to participate.

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Sep 03

Consumer Protections in Today’s Long-Term Care Insurance Policies

There are many protections for consumers in today’s long-term care insurance policies.

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Aug 23

The Impact of Long-Term Care on the Employer

Many employers have come to recognize that long-term care insurance can be “productivity insurance.”

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Mar 11

Trends in LTCI or Trains?

Trends in LTCI or Trains? (written for Life Insurance Selling, November 2010 issue) The long-term care insurance industry is hanging between the Medicaid expansion on one side making people think the state will pay, the CLASS Act on the other side making people think the federal government will pay, and rate increases hanging over us …

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